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Why Do Some Still Text and Drive?

<P style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-layout-grid-align: none" class=MsoNormal><span style="FONT-FAMILY: Arial; FONT-SIZE: 10pt">Alarming statistics show people are still engaging in the risky behavior.<span style="mso-tab-count: 1"> &nbsp; </span><?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /><o:p></o:p></span></P>

    January 24, 2013 - We all know by now that texting while driving is dangerous.

    So why do some continue to do it?

    Alarming statistics show people are still engaging in the risky behavior.  

    A new study reported in the USA Today says 78% of new mothers with babies in the car who are 2 years or younger will talk on their phones.

    And 26% say they text or check e-mails while driving with their baby.

    But why do we engage in a behavior when we know there could be serious consequences?

"It's almost like an arrogance or an ignorance that won't happen to me, so I pick up my phone, I want to see who it is so I can get in touch with them even though I might see them in five minutes or ten minutes, it's that need for instant gratification," said Amanda Merski, MSW, LSW SVHC Behavioral Services.

    Law enforcement officials have said the recent law making texting while driving illegal is tricky to enforce.

    That means if you text and drive you might get away with it.

    And as human beings, that tempts us to continue the bad behavior.

"When it doesn't happen on a regular basis and it's not that immediate threat that something's going to happen to you, you're going to continue that behavior because it hasn't happened before," Merski said.

    Hundreds of students at General McLane heard from JET24, FOX66, yourerie.com, along with the Pennsylvania State Police and the Purchase and George Law Firm.

"We know one message isn't going to get the job done," said Eric Purchase, attorney. "But we also believe if we keep the message up and we keep going at it in different ways we'll eventually make an impact."

    Spreading the word about the dangers of distracted driving can help lower the number of people who are on their phones behind the wheel, but unfortunately, experts say it sometimes takes a bad accident or for one to be directly affected for it to sink in.

"We don't really think about things until maybe it's a little too late," Merski said. "So I encourage people to not text and drive and think about the dangers you can cause to yourself and an innocent victim."

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