Erie County receiving $2.5 million to replace wastewater pump station on Oliver Rd

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Erie County will be receiving a $2.5 million loan to replace a pump station on Oliver Rd.

Erie is one of 19 counties in Pennsylvania that will receive $117 million for improvements to drinking water and wastewater, as well as non-point source projects, Governor Wolf announced today.

The new pump station in Summit Twp. will increase design capacity from 180 to 800 gallons-per-minute.

“This historic investment in Pennsylvania’s clean water and healthy communities serves as a fitting celebration of Earth Week, when our country celebrates advances in environmental protection and committed stewardship of our lands and waters,” said Governor Wolf. “Not only do the awards made in our communities strengthen our clean water facilities, but they also address legacy contaminants like lead and PFAS, which should never endanger the welfare of our children and families.” 

The funding for these projects originates from a combination of state funds approved by voters, Growing Greener, Marcellus Legacy funds, federal grants to PENNVEST from the Environmental Protection Agency, and recycled loan repayments from previous PENNVEST funding awards. Funds for these projects are disbursed after expenses for work are paid and receipts are submitted to PENNVEST for review. 

Find the full list of projects below:  

Non-Point Source Projects

Lancaster County 

  • **Lancaster County Conservation District – received a $708,183 loan to address animal waste storage and removal at a dairy farm, redirecting barnyard seepage and runoff from nearby tributaries. The project will eliminate approximately 4,408 pounds of sediment, 1,921 pounds of nitrogen and 6,719 pounds of phosphorus annually. 

Lycoming County 

  • Old Lycoming Township – received a $388,757 loan to acquire a new vacuum street sweeper, reducing sediment and debris runoff into nearby waterways. The acquisition and use of new equipment is anticipated to reduce runoff by 10%, eliminating approximately 100,000 pounds of sediment within the first permit cycle. The removal of sediment will also reduce nitrogen and phosphorus runoff in waterways of multiple municipalities. 

Drinking Water Projects 

Allegheny County 

  • *Municipal Authority of the City of New Kensington – received a $1,753,876 grant to replace approximately 326 lead service lines.  The project will aid in the reduction of unaccounted-for water loss and reduce the possibility of lead-contaminated water for users.
  • *Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority – received a $2,976,450 grant and a $35,573,550 loan to replace approximately 25,000 feet of distribution piping and 592 lead service lines. The project will reduce water main breaks and eliminate lead exposure to 70,481 residential customers. 
  • *West View Water Authority – received a $6,600,000 grant to replace 500 lead services and associated infrastructure, totaling more than 20,000 feet of copper piping.  The project will reduce the possibility of lead-contaminated water and provide customers with healthier water quality. 
  • *Wilkinsburg-Penn Joint Water Authority – received a $9,330,720 grant to replace approximately 1,000 lead service lines, totaling 40,000 feet of piping.  The project will improve water quality supplied to customers and eliminate the potential for lead contamination. 

Beaver County 

  • *Municipal Water Authority of Aliquippa – received a $2,041,700 grant to replace 184 existing lead water service lines with copper water service lines.  The project will address a Maximum Contaminant Level violation and satisfy a Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection Consent Order and Agreement. 

Cambria County  

  • *Carrolltown Borough Municipal Authority – received a $300,000 grant to replace approximately 520 individual service meters with lead-free magnetic meters, and replace flow control valves with lead-free valves.  The project will reduce the possibility of lead-contaminated water and decrease unaccounted-for water loss.
  • *Patton Municipal Authority – received a $600,000 grant to replace approximately 700 feet of cast iron pipe that has leaded joints, as well as 600 feet of service line.  The project will support water loss efforts by replacing aged infrastructure and reduce the possibility of lead-contaminated water. 

Clarion County 

  • *Knox Borough – received a $1,577,200 grant to replace 5,100 feet of existing cast iron water lines that contain lead components to improve service to 76 connections.  The project will improve the system’s water conservation by eliminating water line leaks and eliminate lead exposure to users. 

Clearfield County 

  • *Falls Creek Borough Municipal Authority – received a grant of $1,400,000 to replace approximately 2,600 feet of lead water mains within the Main Street water distribution line with polyvinyl chloride piping.  The project will reduce unaccounted-for water loss and eliminate lead exposure to the community. 

Franklin County 

  • *Borough of Chambersburg – received a $3,299,828 grant to remove and replace up to 1,968 lead goosenecks, in addition to any lead or galvanized service lines encountered during the removal process. The process will reduce lead exposure to approximately 8,209 residential customers and maintain compliance with federal lead and copper guidelines. 

Huntingdon County 

  • *Mount Union Municipal Authority – received a $1,900,000 grant and a $240,000 loan to replace approximately 2,060 residential and commercial meters, while also removing any lead or galvanized service lines encountered during removal. The project will improve the ability to monitor water usage and water loss more accurately while eliminating lead exposure to users. 

Lancaster County 

  • *Columbia Water Company – received a $4,500,000 loan to construct two new intake screens with air burst and frazil ice protection systems, in addition to a new natural gas emergency/standby generator. The project will improve system intake, which is subject to clogging from frazil ice, and will replace equipment that has reached the end of useful life. 

Lehigh County 

  • *City of Bethlehem – received a $2,875,000 grant to replace approximately 250 existing residential lead service lines for an estimated total of 12,500 feet of assumed lead materials.  The project will reduce public exposure to lead in drinking water and improve reliability of service by replacing aged, failing water lines. 

Potter County 

  • *Shinglehouse Borough – received a $1,078,785 grant to install a new iron and manganese filtration system for a back-up well water source.  The project will reduce contaminants below maximum levels and improve water quality. 

Schuylkill County  

  • *Borough of Schuylkill Haven – received a $529,645 grant to replace approximately 54 existing lead service lines, for an estimated total of 3,000 feet. The project will reduce public exposure to lead in drinking water and unaccounted-for water loss. 

Venango County 

  • *General Authority of the City of Franklin – received a $914,602 grant to replace approximately 4,400 feet of lead piping, joints, and service laterals.  The project will eliminate lead exposure in the water supply and reduce the potential risk of long-term health effects for users. 

Westmoreland County 

  • *The Municipal Authority of the Borough of Derry – received a $2,896,669 grant to replace approximately 170 lead service lines, extending from the distribution main to residential property curb stops.  The project will reduce the possibility of lead-contaminated water and replace aged distribution lines, aiding in the reduction of unaccounted-for water loss. 

Wastewater Projects 

Blair County 

  • Duncansville Municipal Authority – received an $840,650 grant and a $409,350 loan to repair a belt press facility and convert a sludge storage building into a rotary press facility with dewatering equipment.  The project will address National Fire Protection Agency code requirements and improve a system that has reached the end of useful life. 

Dauphin County  

  • **Capital Region Water – received a $21,000,000 loan to rehabilitate and replace deteriorated sewer piping, while also installing a new stormwater system throughout the service area. The project will reduce raw sewage overflows and resulting exposure to the public, while also addressing combined sewer stormwater systems affecting the Susquehanna River. 
  • Londonderry Township – received a $100,479 grant and a $499,521 loan to install 4,425 feet of sanitary sewer main, with associated valves and cleanout assemblies. The project will replace septic systems that have failed, are failing, or are suspected failures. 

Erie County 

  • **Summit Township Sewer Authority – received a $2,500,000 loan to replace an existing pump station on Oliver Road, increasing design capacity from 180 to 800 gallons-per-minute. The project will address a Corrective Action Plan and allow for new connections to the existing wastewater system, while also reducing untreated or inadequately-treated discharges into local waterways draining into Elk Creek and Lake Erie. 

Fayette County 

  • Masontown Municipal Authority – received an $8,345,355 grant and a $1,214,259 loan to eliminate over 50,000 feet of existing vitrified clay pipe, which has been identified as an infiltration source or as unserviceable. The project will eliminate wet weather overflows and diminish adverse impacts on aquatic life in tributaries of the Monongahela River. 

Northumberland County 

  • Lewis Township – received a $1,002,000 loan to establish public sewer service for homes in the area of Schell Road and Koch Road, including installation of 1,443 feet of gravity sewer main and 3,700 feet of high-density force mains.  The project will eliminate malfunctioning onlot disposal systems and threats to public health resulting from those systems. 

* denotes projects that are funded with Drinking Water State Revolving Funds  

** denotes projects that are funded with Clean Water State Revolving Funds 

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